Georgia (US) prison strike and semi-related

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Red Hughs
Georgia (US) prison strike and semi-related
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This has been on libcom but seems very worth mentioning.

It certainly seems possible that revolts in the American Gulag may have slow reverberations through-out this country.

I was speaking to a friend of mine in central California yesterday, also.

He described a vast number of people living in foreclosed but unclaimed houses.

The crisis seems to be gradually reaching a level where it is hard to avoid. At the same time, the ruling class' efforts to censor the Internet might be their response to this - crisis gets worse = control information more.

 

 

 

 

 

devoration1
This is all pointing to the

This is all pointing to the growing realization among the entire working class that the depth of the crisis was not apparent or appreciated. There are certain problems which seem to be regional- like the foreclosure crisis in foreclosure heavy areas, far above average unemployment in certain areas (like Michigan), etc. The media feeds into this idea that the problems associated with the crisis are smaller than they are, or are peculiarities of certain regions.

Alf
This is an interesting

This is an interesting report. The overcoming of racial divisions and the elaboration of clear, unifying demands points to this revolt being permeated with a proletarian spirit. 

Alf
This is an interesting

This is an interesting report. The overcoming of racial divisions and the elaboration of clear, unifying demands points to this revolt being permeated with a proletarian spirit. 

Alf
This is an interesting

This is an interesting report. The overcoming of racial divisions and the elaboration of clear, unifying demands points to this revolt being permeated with a proletarian spirit. 

jk1921
Across the U.S. hundreds of

Across the U.S. hundreds of thousands of people are living for free in houses where they cannot pay the note, because the banks cannot prove they own the right to foreclose. This situation cannot last forever. The Obama administration, worried that this will bring more chaos to Wall Street, has already signaled that foreclosures should proceed. Soon another wave of foreclosures will bring more misery and hardship to the working class. Will this lead to a growing desire to look outside the system for solutions to this misery?