Violence In American Emergency Wards: BellWeather Of Capitalist Decomposition

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Red Hughs
Violence In American Emergency Wards: BellWeather Of Capitalist Decomposition
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The United States altogether in general offers less social welfare than European Nations and offers virtually none at all to those outside certain protected categories (if you are under 65, not a mother, and haven't worked for a while, you will receive little or nothing). So here the emergency wards have become the medical and social welfare resource of last resort and naturally this is where acts of those desperate, distrubed and crushed by capitalism play out:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/09/16/hospital.violence.hopkins/?hpt=T2

"Early in her 43-year career, Anderson said, nurses usually were struck by a person with dementia or mental health problems or who was under the influence.

'But lately, in the past 10 or 15 years, that's not the case,' Anderson said. 'People are just tired of waiting, or they are just angry that they're not getting the care they feel is acceptable. Instead of saying something, their response is hitting, screaming, spitting, yelling.' "

Ironically, the corrupt and bizarre "medical industry" is also the largest growth industry in the US...

Anyone have ideas for tactics that patients and staff might use against this situation - I'm thankfully in good health myself but I do have aging parent with some medical problems...

 

 

 

 

ernie
basic solidarity

The situation is the same in the ER´s of the NHS. In some of the main cities nurses have to wear stab proof visits and attacks are a regular occurance, and there are police on duty in the ER. The problem is the fact that hospital beds have been cut back more and more. My local hospital has 20% less beds than it had 18 years ago and the population has increased by about 10%. This means that the flow of patients through an ER is slow, also at times there are not enough doctors and nurses due to spending restrictions etc. What can patients and medical workers do? That is very difficult. But remembering that patients and medical workers are all under great stress i.e. basic solidarity, is a great help. Too often a sense of us and them will develop as everyone struggles to get or give help. From my experience of ER´s 95% of people are very happy just to get help

ernie
basic solidarity

The situation is the same in the ER´s of the NHS. In some of the main cities nurses have to wear stab proof visits and attacks are a regular occurance, and there are police on duty in the ER. The problem is the fact that hospital beds have been cut back more and more. My local hospital has 20% less beds than it had 18 years ago and the population has increased by about 10%. This means that the flow of patients through an ER is slow, also at times there are not enough doctors and nurses due to spending restrictions etc. What can patients and medical workers do? That is very difficult. But remembering that patients and medical workers are all under great stress i.e. basic solidarity, is a great help. Too often a sense of us and them will develop as everyone struggles to get or give help. From my experience of ER´s 95% of people are very happy just to get help

may
Agree basic solidarity is the key

I agree with Ernie the issue is basic solidarity. I remember hearing from a doctor in India who told about a struggle (in the 80s I think but can't remember any details) where junior doctors and hospital staff were being attacked and realised that this was linked to atrocious conditions for staff and patients. Hospital management of course tried to play on the division.

As for the NHS in the UK, with something like 20% efficiency savings being demanded over the next few years, clinical staff having to more and more justify the cost of every treatment, computer software forever asking if you wouldn't rather use something cheaper instead... Like everywhere else things are going to get harder.