China: the intensification of workers' struggles

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Kontrrazvedka
China: the intensification of workers' struggles
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The discussion that follows was prompted by the article: China: the intensification of workers' struggles. The discussion was initiated by Kontrrazvedka.
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Kontrrazvedka
East Asia

Nice article! Anyhow, today I went to libcom and found this article: http://libcom.org/blog/workers-struggles-east-asia-april-2012-03052012

It gives a lot of good data which is connected to your article.

Alf
Hello

Hello comrade and welcome to the ICC forum...but do you have a particular point to make about the China article?

Fred
Thanks baboon for this very

Thanks baboon for this very informative article about the sufferings of the working class in China. And suffer they certainly do, both in the wok place - extreme exploitation is tbe order of the day - and outside, should they dare complain. And complain they do. There's no passive acceptance here. Chinese workers are "being tempered in the class struggle" as baoon points out. Let's hope they are being steeled for greater and more significant struggles soon to come.

So what is it like being a worker in China - assuming that is you survive the daily lot of sudden sackings, factory closures, loss of health care, disappearances, deportations and the like, all of which provide so much fodder for the West's "Human Rights Industry"! (good point)

Well, in addition to the total unpredictability of lifer from minute to minute: "... repression and surveillance is of course the speciality of a Stalinist state and, like the Arab regimes, this state also uses gangs of armed thugs that it pays and  transports around the country for use against the workers. Internal police spending in China for 2010 and projected for 2011 outstrips the external defence budget – which is not inconsiderable."

It has been known for some time that life as a worker is not all fun. Various commentators have made the point. But tbe present conditions for workers in China remind me in many ways of Engels' descriptions of working class life in 1840's England. In other words: completely inhuman and unbearable. But now there's a way out. Let's take it!