Solidarity appeal for the renovation of Gondolkodó Autonóm Antikvárium (Gondolkodó Autonomous Bookshop), Budapest

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jk1921
Solidarity appeal for the renovation of Gondolkodó Autonóm Antikvárium (Gondolkodó Autonomous Bookshop), Budapest
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The discussion that follows was prompted by the article: Solidarity appeal for the renovation of Gondolkodó Autonóm Antikvárium (Gondolkodó Autonomous Bookshop), Budapest. The discussion was initiated by jk1921.
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jk1921
I have conflicting feelings

I have conflicting feelings about this. On the one had, it would be a good if the comrades could renovate the shop, which sounds like it is not in the best of shape. On the other hand, I wonder if their financial situation reflects a more general problem of solidarity in the proletarian movement today, especially in the age of the Internet, where everything is expected to be given away for free. Does anyone even buy books or printed press anymore? The general attitude seems to be if its not on the Internet for free, why bother with it? I imagine the ICC has encountered its own problems with this as it must be increasingly difficult to sell a printed newspaper these days.

Of course, there is no going backwards, but how do we address the issue of solidarity on the financial level in this environment? I am not sure one-off calls for donations (a kind of crowd sourcing) is the best way to do it. it seems like what is needed is developing a culture of regular (even if nominal) financial support for the very fragile organizational and insitutional (Yes, I am calling a bookshop an instituion) expressions of the proletarian milieu. But I know talking about money makes many people nervous and uncomfortable.

Fred
Quote:  A bookshop can be a

Quote:
 A bookshop can be a place for distributing revolutionary positions and – even more important – for discussions about them in search for political clarification and theoretical coherence.

 

Interesting the  ICC emphasizes  bookshops as places for discussion.  Does talking about money make people nervous and uncomfortable?  Not having any, or having a heck of a lot, may cause problems, but money per se is such a ridiculous topic why would anyone want to talk about it?  

 

As to committing to regular donations to something: this is more difficult to do in this precarious society when you can't be sure you'll have a job at all this time next year. 

 

 

And then there's books v. the Internet.  Commiegal said she'd rather read yer actual book in its old-fashioned style than do it on the net.  I agree.  Pieces of printed paper in book form present themselves differently to the eye than does a piece of plastic with light shining through it - to point out the obvious.  But I suppose we'd need Marshall McLuhan to explain this properly and at enormous boring length!  And then there's illuminated manuscripts! And cave paintings which may or may not include the first attempts at writing?  But give me a penguin.