10 shades of non-revolution

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jk1921
10 shades of non-revolution
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The discussion that follows was prompted by the article: 10 shades of non-revolution. The discussion was initiated by jk1921.
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jk1921
Not to mention the 1994

Not to mention the 1994 "Republican Revolution" in the United States............

kinglear
ten shades of revolution

There isn't really anything in this article to disagree with, so it's impossible to discuss it. Was the American Revolution in 1776 a revolution, or a coup d'état by a state in the making? Was the American Civil War a revolution?

kinglear
ten shades of revolution

There isn't really anything in this article to disagree with, so it's impossible to discuss it. Was the American Revolution in 1776 a revolution, or a coup d'état by a state in the making? Was the American Civil War a revolution?

Red Hughs
You might also say

You might also say "capitalist world in flux as decomposition mounts..."

With more perspective, the events in Egypt seem like the only ones with a significant proletarian component (though with lots of confusion there as well). But even the bourgeois struggles today seem present some challenge for the world capitalist order.

Libya was blamed for a spike in oil prices which continues and certainly takes large chunk out of the average American's living standard. And Libya likely was only the "spark" which simply ignited a speculative fire storm.

With profits dried up and the system falling apart, "hot money" rushes to buy or sell commodities for quick profits - and further destabilizes the system.

Naturally, one shouldn't say this with a triumphalist tone, since of this stuff impels the capitalists launch further attacks.

 It's interesting how some capitalists also seem to panicking at the present prospects. 

 (or at least selling panic to others)

 

Devrim
'Proletarian content?'

Red Hughs wrote:
With more perspective, the events in Egypt seem like the only ones with a significant proletarian component (though with lots of confusion there as well).

I don't think that this is correct. The events in Tunisia, and also Algeria seem to have had a much deeper proletarian content than those in Egypt. If you just look at the figures of workers on strike alone there were at least four times as many workers on Strike in Tunisia than Egypt despite it having only an eighth of the population.

Devrim