Furor Over “Voter Suppression”: Political Expedience and the Democratic Illusion

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Fred
Furor Over “Voter Suppression”: Political Expedience and the Democratic Illusion
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The discussion that follows was prompted by the article: Furor Over “Voter Suppression”: Political Expedience and the Democratic Illusion. The discussion was initiated by Fred.
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Fred
Laurel and Hardy

Thanks Henk for this excellent article. While reading it, and considering the political antics of the bourgeoisie in trying to resolve their political crises, I was reminded of Laurel and Hardy. They could never resolve anything either, and Stan would end up in tears while Olly's pomposity and his tendency to get egg on his face, no matter what, could be excruciatingly funny. As wikipedia puts it: "their characters preclude them form making any real progress in even the simplest endeavors." Is this not the world-wide bourgeoisie today? Their economy forbids them any sense. But sadly, they have substituted war, austerity and violence, for the banana skin and the custard pie. "Now look what a mess you've gotten me into! "

Red Hughs
Interesting article One thing

Interesting article

One thing worth saying is how election-stealing is hardly new in the US. It was fairly well known that Joseph Kennedy bought the election for JFK. I remember Richard Nixon saying years later in his interview with David Frost that he hadn't contested the '62 election because want to maintain ... faith in the system.

So the main point is that, as the article says, it is political crisis where two factions are fighting more ruthlessly than ever - ironically since they have fewer policy differences than ever.

The situation is aptly described by the article: The ideological decay of a significant part of the ruling class (particularly the Republican Party), which correlates with the ideological hardening of society in general. More and more, American society is divided into two ideological-political blocs, each counting for slightly less than half of the voting population. Increasingly, society is divided into two opposed cultural narratives, between which little rational discourse and exchange is possible. As a result, politics degenerates more and more into a pure power contest.

The ironic aspect of this is that equal division of these two blocs is maintained by the economics of the election process. Each side attempts to attain a position on the "political spectrum" where it can receive 51% of the votes. The entire ideological game is something of a "cost-benefit" analysis. Yet certainly there is also the "more extreme" end of each side where each candidate must begin their game of moving towards the center.

I would suppose that the situation is as Marx described it years ago - the main prize for each is possession of the state:

The structure of capitalist enterprises today seems to be that while some ruthlessly and efficiently compete on something like a free market, another large portion maintain their position through having entirely captured the government agencies originally meant to regulate them. The situation would seem to be a natural result of the tendency of capital to concentrate but this situation means that the struggle for control of the state becomes an even more pressing question than usual for the various bourgeois factions.

jk1921
It seems that concern is

It seems that concern is growing that this election will be a rehash of 2000, but this time with Obama winning the Electoral College and Romney racking up such huge margins in the red states that he wins the popular vote. Wouldn't that be an interesting hot mess?