What does it mean to struggle as part of the working class?

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Fred
What does it mean to struggle as part of the working class?
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The discussion that follows was prompted by the article: What does it mean to struggle as part of the working class?. The discussion was initiated by Fred.
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Fred
love versus capitalism

Alex wrote:
The question of extending a struggle to link up with other workers is not just a useful tactic; it goes to the heart of what the working class is as the class that collectively produces in capitalism. And it is illegal. So a good citizen may withdraw his or her labour from a particular boss with whom there is a contract of employment, but may not legally try to extend that struggle to others who are equally affected by the dispute. Workers in Port Talbot are not the only ones who are affected by the decisions of Tata Steel: a much greater number of workers in the supply chain also find their jobs at risk because they are all associated in various aspects of the production of goods that goes far wider than even a huge multinational. This is the basis for the working class, when it sees itself as a class, to develop the power of solidarity, and also to develop a perspective for society as a whole which is in total contradiction with capitalism’s war of each against all.

Solidarity is at the very heart of what the working class is - a revolutionary class with a love of humanity as it's very essence.  The exact opposite this of the cold hearted bourgeois  imprisoned in the icy enclosure of individual self-interest. But the love  of humanity as expressed in working class solidarity is of course illegal under bourgeois rule. No surprise there. The bourgeois imposition of illegality on human solidarity and love says it all! 

Alex wrote:
Going back to the example of the junior doctors, their dispute has an impact on all those who rely on the health service, which is recognised but distorted in the totally false ideology of defending the NHS. So we have seen pickets with posters “hoot if you heart the NHS”, as we have in many struggles in the health service, just as the miners called for support to British coal. It is a trap that keeps workers tied to their employer, their sector, their isolation from other workers. And it is clearly not true. Striking health service workers do not love the NHS, they are on strike against it because they are being exploited by it. What they ‘love’ is not the real NHS with all the cuts and cost savings, but the idea of a health service that gives them adequate resources to look after patients well and do a job they love. There is no perspective for such a health service in capitalism.
 

As Alex says: striking health workers don't really "love" the Health Service which actually exploits their talents and good natured love  for their patients for its own purposes. What they really love is the idea of a Health Service as it will be under communism. There  is no prospect for such generous human  bounty under capitalism. 

Everything comes down to love versus capitalism.  And the two can never meet. 

 

lem_
I'm ambivalent; you are right

I'm ambivalent; you are right that there are probably warm, genuine capitalists out there, who don't understand their wealth.

I think that both the ideal of peace and love, and their antithesis, can be overplayed.

There's not a thing wrong with being appalled at e.g. the forcible clearance of refugee camps, on the grounds of pity or compassion. That's totally natural, IMO. The difference between the liberal / cpaitalist and proletarian versions of this, is surely practical

lem_
uh it's probably quite a lot

uh it's probably quite a lot more complciated than i suggested. the capitalist class, for obvious reasons, don't have to be cowed into senseless fear of each other, or pitted against each other in quite the same way.

would be difficult to recover an actual person from the ideological mess that everyone is choking on... i still think that hate isn't an especially helpful way to approach the question of the capitalist, but yeah, is there a detestable kindness ?