For old times' sake

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Frank the Tank
For old times' sake
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I have just done a translation of the Polish "Warsawyanka" (French "Varsovienne") which, in its Spanish version,  was a rallying song for the Left during the Spanish civil war. It's also called "A Las Barricadas".

Enjoy this bit of history!

THE VARSOVIENNE

The enemy's storms whirl through the skies
Threatening clouds block out the light
Even if pain and death await us
Against our foes our duty calls
We have raised the bright flame of freedom
High above our charging heads
The flag of victory, the freedom of peoples
That surely will lead us to the final war

Arise now to bloody and holy battle
Vanqush your foes, you workerfolk!
To the barricades, to the barricades!
Conquer the world, you workerfolk!

Death and destruction to all our oppressors
Our deeds are done for the suffering folk
We turn against them their murdering weapons
So that they may reap what they've sown
The earth is drenched with the blood of the workers
Give your blood for the last victory
That mankind may find salvation
We celebrate the holy victory

Arise now to bloody and holy battle
Vanqush your foes, you workerfolk!
To the barricades, to the barricades!
Conquer the world, you workerfolk!

Arise now to bloody and holy battle
Vanqush your foes, you workerfolk!
To the barricades, to the barricades!
Conquer the world, you workerfolk!

We are all plagued by hunger and hardship
Against our foes we are driven by need
Freedom and joy for all the world's people
The fighting youth do not run from death
The dead who died for that great idea
Forever are martyred among millions
Arise and fight, brothers and comrades
Seize your weapons and close your ranks

Arise now to bloody and holy battle
Vanqush your foes, you workerfolk!
To the barricades, to the barricades!
Conquer the world, you workerfolk!

Alf
song from Poland/Spain

Hello

Thanks for that. I believe it goes back to the 1830-31 uprising in Poland, which I don't know much about.

As a matter of interest, which language did you translate it from?