Trump in Europe: an expression of capitalism in turmoil

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jk1921
Trump in Europe: an expression of capitalism in turmoil
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jk1921
The contradiction between the

The contradiction between the weight of military spending on the overall "health" of the US economy and the need for the US to continue in some role as a global hegemon is just that: a contradiction. It is the same contradiction that previous administrations have faced. Trump is not the first US President to raise the issue of other NATO countries' not carrying their weight in regards to military spending. He isn't even the first raise the issue of the Russia-Germany pipeline. The difference appears to be that while previous administrations desired to maintain the structures of US hegemony, of which NATO has been an important feature, by attempting to further integrate the other nations into them, Trump may actually be working to sabotage them, demanding other nations raise their military spending by 4 percent, rather than 2, which would appear to be impractical and designed to provoke future tensions. Of course, there is also the danger that too harsh an approach to the NATO "allies" could only alienate them and further encourage the everyman for himself tendency, which Trump may not actually have a problem with, having been variously described as the first "post-exceptional" President or as a "transactional" President who recognizes other powers have their own legitimate foreign policy (read imperialist) interests and that the neo-liberal consensus of the US remaining the only legitimate power in the world can no longer be maintained.

Of course, Trump's position, whatever motivates it, is simply anathema to the bulk of the "permanent (deep) state," and as such he is being viciously opposed by all the mainstream and legacy media outlets, while non-peripheral figures in the Democratic Party scream about "treason," "collusion" and suggest that the entire Trump presidency is nothing more than a Russian op. While it is possible that Trump's time in office will not last much longer, there is nevertheless deep fear in the main factions of the ruling class that the damage he is wrecking will be permanent and the institutions of the post-WWII order will finally collapse as erstwhile allies figure that even if Trump stands outside the main factions of the US bourgeoisie, the US political process can no longer be relied upon to produce stable outcomes that support the neo-liberal consensus going forward.

As for the anti-Trump demos in the UK and elsewhere, to say they remained on the "bourgeois terrain" is quite an understatement. A complete farce may be more accurate. But in this, Trump is proving a certain worth to beleaguered leaders and parties in other Western countries, as he takes the heat off of them becomming the focus of global outrage--so easily parodied and mocked. Of course, why the UK's own Draconian immigration policies never provoked the same domestic outrage is a mystery, which demonstrates the role of a certain anti-American ideology and a certain personalization of evil (which Trump obviously facilitates) in dampening down a genuine questioning of the global nature of this system. Is a leader who summarily strips citizens of their passports without so much as hearing (which May did during her time as Home Secretary--after which some of the subjects were promptly droned) any less of a moral abomination than one who uses the seperation of children from their parents as a detterent to immigration?