British imperialism: the uses of war and terrorism

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baboon
British imperialism: the uses of war and terrorism
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baboon
Saudi-led Coalition in Yemen includes al-Qaida

Associated Press (reported today) and the terrorist-tracking Jamestown Foundation have released a detailed report today that shows that elements of al-Qaida (AQAP) have been integrated into the US/Saudi/British et al, Coalition fighting in Yemen.In the fifth largest port in the country, Mukalla, AQAP members were allowed to leave the port with heavy weapons and vast amounts of looted cash with many integrated into the Coalition forces. The US held off drone strikes during and after the deal with the terrorists. As well as the looted cash, AQAP was paid by the coalition to leave the port or join the US/British assisted forces by the UAE. Many such deals appear to have been done and the usual procedure is for the Coalition to announce that "hundreds of AQ militants have been killed" (totally denied by the locals) while paying them off or integrating them into their armies. Another example of how the US and Britain along with their Gulf allies, exercise their "War on Terror" by aligning with the terrorists they are supposed to be fighting.

baboon
yemen

One of the side-effects of the Khashoggi killing in the Saudi embassy in Turkey has been to turn attention to the American and British backed war in Yemen. The British press continues to use the 2016 UN estimated number of deaths of ten thousand whereas new research from "Armed Conflict Location", quoted in Middle East Eye, 29.10.18, estimates the minimum number of casualties at 56,000, which doesn't include those dying of malnutrition or disease and which could double that number. What will certainly increase that number is the renewed "Coalition" assault on the port of Hodeidah and the bombing of the capital Sanaa, an intensification of the fighting which seems to have been agreed by the British Foreign Office while Boris Johnson was Foreign Secretary (not that he would have known much about it). The plan is clear and the weapon is mass starvation against the Houtis, i.e., a man-made famine. The criticism of Britain's involvement by the left is usually based on Britain's "arms sales" (the extent of which are masked by British figures) but the British state is implicated in the war much deeper than that, militarily and politically.

 

The British government seemed to be taken by surprise by the latest US "peace initiative" forced on it by the toxicity of Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) felt in some significant sectors of the US bourgeoisie but the initiative is a sham and Britain reluctantly tail-ended it. The Iranian influence in Yemen has always been exaggerated by the west but the former is in less of a position here given how it's getting more and more bogged down in Iran and Syria - and growing protests at home.

 

Reported in M.E. Eye about a week ago, was the fact that the 70-year old brother of the Saudi king, Prince Ahmad bin Abdul-Aziz, was returning to Saudi from London where he had been in virtual exile and pointedly made no oath of allegiance to the prince. This is a risky undertaking given how he has vehemently criticised MbS in public in the past and he wouldn't have returned to the snake-pit without strong guarantees from the British and Americans. It's another example of business and war as usual with the Saudis but it could prove destabilising.